Creative artists and creative scientists: Where does the buck stop?

Citation:

Noonan, J. & Gardner, H., 2014. Creative artists and creative scientists: Where does the buck stop?. In S. Moran, D. Cropley, & J. Kaufman, ed. The Ethics of Creativity. New York. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, pp. 92-115.
Creative artists and creative scientists: Where does the buck stop?

Abstract:

Noonan and Gardner suggest there are consequences to creative activity, which they call “post-creative developments.” They describe four types of post-creative-development roles: the Opportunist, portrayed through artist Shepard Fairey's famous Obama poster; the Reluctant Winner, exemplified by songwriter Gretchen Peters’ passive benefits from others’ misuse of her hit song “Independence Day”; the Unlucky Gambler, characterized by how Nazi-era German filmmaker Leni Riefenstahl's distortion of Nazi influence on her work undermined her own reputation; and theHostage, represented by how Erich Maria Remarque's All Quiet on the Western Front went from instant international sensation to banned book. Noonan and Gardner conclude that creative individuals are not responsible solely for ideas, but are also responsible to ideas. This responsibility extends well beyond the moment at which individuals put their ideas into the world.

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Last updated on 01/16/2018